Summer STEAM Activities

Projects that incorporate science, technology, engineering, arts, and math are not only good for children’s development, but they can be so much fun. 

We have noticed in our classrooms how much our students love these projects and how they allow them to have more ownership over their own learning. We often connect lessons and standards with STEM or STEAM projects. These help them develop a love for learning, helps with problem solving skills, and gets them to express their creativity. 

Summer is a great time to do some STEM and STEAM projects with your child. With more time on our hands and less stress, these projects are one way to enrich learning over the summer. You can go beyond the practice sheets and get your child really interested in learning through hands on activities. 

Checkout some more great STEAM projects we found for summer!

Summer Steam Projects

Free Summer STEM 

Ice Cream in a Bag

Awesome Engineering Activities for Kids

STEAM Lab

Little Bins for Little Hands

A great way to integrate STEAM projects is through literature. You are all aware by now how important we believe reading to be for a child. You can read a book together with them or have your child read the book to you. After the reading portion, challenge them with a STEAM project. 

The Three Little Pigs: An Architectural Tale  is a great book to read. After Reading it, you could challenge your child to build a house that could withstand a wolf huffing and puffing (or your blow dryer).

The Most Magnificent Thing is all about creativity. After reading this book you can have you child create their very own most magnificent thing.

Ada Twist, Scientist Students love science experiments. A great one to do over the summer when it is hot and you can go outside is the rainbow geyser experiment.

Rosie Revere Engineer is one of our favorite STEM books. After reading this book your child can build their own hovercraft.

Like these, there are many other books that connect literature to STEAM. After you have done one of these projects, you can extend the learning by having your child reflect in writing on their process. What would they do different? What would they do the same? What worked? What did not work? Did they enjoy the project and why or why not? This allows them to practice their writing skills and reflect on what they did. 

Summer review does not have to be all worksheets. Through STEM and STEAM projects, children can practice academic skills and enjoy themselves while doing it, after all learning should be fun. And what better time for fun learning than summer time?

A huge thing right now is monthly subscription boxes. If you are looking to make these projects a regular occurrence around your house, we found a list of STEAM boxes here for kids that would be a hit in any house.

Girl Empowerment

In our last post, we shared some of our favorite books that relate to inclusivity and equity. This week we wanted to include even more that relate specifically to girl empowerment. 

Giving young girls of all backgrounds mirrors to see themselves in the books they read is incredibly powerful and empowers them as they grow up.  We feel it will give them confidence to navigate and breakdown the inequities that are a part of society.

As educators and women, we feel that it is important to educate young girls (in age appropriate ways) on some of the things they will encounter in the world. Our hope is that through literature girls will gain the knowledge and tools to overcome adversity and change the systems that exclude people. 

Here are some of our favorite books to empower young girls:

Providing young girls with both fiction and non-fiction books that they can relate to can be such a powerful tool. When a girl can see herself in a story, it can change her life in a beautiful way. Now, more than ever, we need to empower our girls and let them know that they can fight for what they want.

Diverse Books

Last week we offered suggestions for summer reading for children of different ages. This week we wanted to continue our book talk by focusing on diverse and inclusive books for your child. As we wrote last week, summer break offers a nice time to explore and read books with children. 

Diverse books are important for children of all ages. “Multicultural literature serves as a powerful tool in enabling students to gain a better understanding of both their own culture and the cultures of others.” (The importance of multicultural literature

In our classrooms, we learn about and celebrate a variety of cultures, and we often find that our students are incredibly curious and so happy to learn about cultures from all over the world. 

Representation matters. This is especially true for children. When they see themselves in the books that they read, they understand that they matter too. When we see people like ourselves in the media, including in fiction, we get a glimpse of who we might become, and we feel validated. We can gain role models and inspiration through literature (Why Children’s Books that Teach Diversity are More Important than Ever). Reading more diverse books is a great way to open the world up for our children. 

“Multicultural literature can help students develop global awareness by introducing them to current cultural issues” (The importance of multicultural literature). Reading books with our children about things that are happening in the world with appropriate content  is good for them. Adults often think that children cannot handle or understand what is happening in our world, but from what we have seen with our students, they can and their thoughts on these matters are usually incredibly insightful.

In recent years, as more diverse books have been published, we have seen a shift in our classrooms toward more inclusivity and equity among our students. The more we read, talk about, and expose our children to inclusive and diverse books, the more this amazing and wonderful trend will continue to grow. 

Below are some recommendations of inclusive and diverse books for children:

What are some of your favorite books that relate to inclusivity and equity?