Back to School For Kids

Summer is coming to an end and it is time for back to school! Heading back to school after summer can bring a mix of emotions for children. Some feel excited, some feel happy, some feel anxious, and some feel dread. It’s normal for children to have different emotions around change and the unknown that a new teacher, classroom, and school year brings with it. No matter how your child is feeling, there are many things you can do to help support a positive start to the school year. 

Routine

If you got out of the normal bedtime routine, try to get back on track a few days or a week before school is set to start so that your child gets used to going to bed and waking up early. It could be a rude awakening on the first day of school if they have become accustomed to staying up or sleeping in late for weeks and months and suddenly have to change their routine. The National Sleep Foundation recommends that school age children (6-13) should get anywhere from 9 to 11 hours of sleep per night. Sleepiness does not make it conducive for student learning, so making sure that they are well-rested for school is important.

Creating a morning routine is especially important because it can set the tone for the day. We are all hurried in the morning, and having a morning routine checklist can help teach your child how to be more independent and help with consistency. We found some great free printables here

Creating a school spot at home at the beginning of the school year will help with misplaced items and aid in developing routine and consistency. At school, students have a specific spot to put their belongings. Having that at home, where they can place their backpacks, water bottles, lunch bags, and any other school supplies, will help foster responsibility and independence. 

Be Positive

With a new school year comes new teachers and new classmates. For many children this usually brings with it a feeling of happiness and excitement. However, if you or your child are feeling less than excited about placement, try to be positive.

Each year is a fresh start. If they are anxious about a student in the class remind your child that everyone is working on something and even if they weren’t friends with a classmate last year it doesn’t mean that they won’t become friends this year. Teach your child to be open to new experiences and new people. 

The same could be said for teacher placement. Your child could have a very different experience than someone else’s child had with that teacher. Different kids need different things, and your child could thrive in that teacher’s classroom. If it turns out to be a more arduous teacher or class, try to remember what we have written in previous posts, sometimes the lesson could be that your child learns to thrive in a less than ideal situation. Because one day they will have to deal with a boss they don’t love, people they don’t agree with, or an incredibly difficult and challenging project in the real world.  

It’s always best to try to base your opinion of a child or a teacher on your own experience and not what you hear about them from others. In addition, try not to speak negatively of teachers in front of your child. Children need to respect all people, and sometimes it is hard to do if they hear their parents saying negative things about them. Kids hear more than we think, and they most definitely will repeat what they hear.

Reassurance

If your child is feeling anxious about the new year, reassure them that on the first day of school, it is everyone’s first day. Many others are also feeling the beginning of the school year jitters. Including the teachers!

Books are wonderful conversation starters, help to justify feelings, and they often help to reassure that they are not alone and that they will be ok.

These are some suggestions of books to read with your child if they are feeling anxious about a new school year. 

  1. The Day you Begin 
  2. All Are Welcome
  3. How to Get Your Teacher Ready
  4. Sorry, Grown Ups, You Can’t Go to School
  5. Pirates Don’t Go to Kindergarten 
  6. It’s Back to School We Go
  7. I don’t Want to Go to School
  8. First Day Jitters

Model

Remember children look to the adults in their lives and how they react to situations as a model for how they should react. If you are dreading the end of summer break, the start of a new school year, a new teacher or a variety of other things, and you are voicing these feelings aloud, your child will too. However, if you are calm, positive, happy, excited to pick up a few school supplies, and exude through your actions and words how awesome a new school year will be, then chances are that your child will too.