Let Kids Be Bored

Today’s parents often feel the need to plan out, have activities, and make sure that their children are entertained all the time. This puts a lot of pressure on the parents to make sure that kids are never bored. Boredom has become synonymous with bad parenting, but in reality, children need the time and space to be bored. And you are not a bad parent if sometimes your child is bored.

A recent study found that boredom can spark individual productivity and creativity. When a person is bored, they allow their minds to wander and daydream. This enhances creative thinking and problem solving. 

Boredom also allows children to be self reliant. When left up to their own devices they have to decide what they want to do. According to Lyn Fry, a child psychologist told  Quartz, “Your role as a parent is to prepare children to take their place in society. Being an adult means occupying yourself and filling up your leisure time in a way that will make you happy. If parents spend all their time filling up their child’s spare time, then the child’s never going to learn to do this for themselves.”

Having to discover what you like to do when you are bored will also allow children to find what they’re really interested in. These interests could lead to passions or hobbies in their lives. However, if they are constantly going from one activity to another, they will never have the down time to figure out where their interests lie. Finding out what makes you happy is important for everyone, especially as children grow up. 

Let your child be bored and they might gruffle and groan for a bit. Stay the course, and  eventually they figure out how to entertain themselves. Whether it is playing with toys they forgot about, building forts out of pillows, writing stories, designing a board game, coloring and painting, or playing imaginative games, children will find ways to entertain themselves. Disconnect your child from all forms of technology, leave them alone, and you would be surprised at the creativity they can unleash.

We often model for children the need to multitask. We overschedule ourselves and our children. We constantly check our phones, email, social media, watching TV and are constantly staying connected. Start by modeling for your children an afternoon of zero technology and just sitting, reading a book, having a conversation with a partner,  or coloring. Show them that it is ok to not do anything sometimes. 

Do not feel bad for having a weekend where nothing is planned. Sometimes social media makes parents feel bad when they are not out at an immersive educational adventurous location. That is not real life, and no one will judge you if every once in a while you and your child do nothing. 

Boredom is good for a child’s development and for parents too. We all need down time. Finding the balance between our go-go-go lives and just being is absolutely necessary for all of us. 

We are here to say, “Let kids be bored!”

Summer Reading for Kids

When parents ask us, what students can be working on during the summer, our answer is always the same: READ, READ, READ! As we have said in previous posts summer should be relaxing and fun for kids. Summer offers a great opportunity to teach kids that reading can be relaxing and fun! You just have to find the right books that interest your child. Kids sometimes need help finding books that they enjoy. Once they find it, you will have trouble pulling them away.

Reading is the best thing for students. Vocabulary, spelling, reading comprehension, and writing skills are all developed and strengthened the more a child reads. Our most curious students and the ones that seem to thrive academically are students who are avid readers. If you want to help your child academically, encouraging reading and helping them find books of interest would be the most helpful thing.

Summer vacation is the perfect time to practice reading with children and help them develop a love and curiosity for books. Below we have a list of books that are good for children of different ages. These recommendations are based on themes and trends that we have noticed in education and in our classroom.

Kindergarten:

First Grade:

Second Grade:

Third Grade:

Fourth Grade

Fifth Grade:

Reading can also be very social for your child. Some ideas would be taking a trip to the public library on a playdate, or even doing a book exchange with friends or neighbors. One thing to always remember is that reading should be treated as a privilege not a punishment. If your child isn’t enjoying it, don’t force it. Take some more time to try to find what books your child might be interested in reading for fun.